Heage, Pentrich and South Wingfield Revolution walk

This circular route starts from Heage Windmill and follows parts of the Pentrich and South Wingfield Revolution story. This is Walk 4 of the Pentrich and South Wingfield Revolution group.

Technical sheet
No. 21608823
A Ripley (Derbyshire) walk posted on 04/05/22 by Pentrich Revolution Group. Update : 17/05/22
Calculated time Calculated time: 3h15[?]
Distance Distance : 6.45mi
Vertical gain Vertical gain : 331ft
Vertical drop Vertical drop : 318ft
Highest point Highest point : 469ft
Lowest point Lowest point : 269ft
Moderate Difficulty : Moderate
Back to starting point Back to starting point : Yes
Walking Walking
Location Location : Ripley (Derbyshire)
Starting point Starting point : N 53.05321° / W 1.454013°
Download : -
The foot bridge The Excavator The pond Morley Park Kilns

Description

(D/A) Starting from Heage Windmill (A) walk 200yrds back along the road then turn left (North) onto the footpath which will take you down towards Sawmills.

(If the windmill is closed then leave the village on the road past the church, following the windmill signs. Take the footpath to your left, after the houses end and before you reach the main windmill entrance. Walk towards the windmill and then take the gate on your right into the field, crossing with the windmill on your left. Reach the roadway, with the footpath straight ahead across the road.)

Follow the path ahead diagonally down the hill, following the footpath signs, crossing stiles, and through pinch posts, mainly in the same direction ignoring turn-offs until you drop into the valley.

(1) Reaching a road, at Lockwoods works, walk ahead over the former canal bridge towards Brickyard Road, turn right (East) and go up the steps to follow the course of the former Cromford Canal as it goes behind the houses along the A610.

(2) Fork to the right where the path divides, go under the road bridge (B6013). (B) Continue, through the cutting, and pass the rear of the Excavator pub on the left. (C) Continue ahead, turn right (South) follow the course of the former canal.

(3) Pass the pond on your left. Cross it at the former canal bridge, immediately turning right (East) at the end of the bridge to join the path continuing ahead on the left side of the water. Continue ahead across the fields to Lower Hartshay. At the road turn right, then immediately left to follow the footpath continuing to follow the course of the canal.

(4) On reaching a road (Main Road), cross the canal, turning right (South-West) to return on the path on the left of the canal to rejoin the road (Bridle Lane) at Lower Hartshay. Turn left, follow the road soon to become a track, up the hill until reaching the road (B6374) at Upper Hartshay. Cross the road and walk to the right (West).

(5) Take the first footpath to the left (South), going through a squeeze stile beside the gate immediately past Hartshay Hall Farm. Follow the footpath ahead (D) , turning left before reaching Manor Farm, cross the fields ahead diagonally (South-East).

(6) Shorter route. At the metal gate in the corner ahead to the road and houses, turn right (West) and follow the road to the T-junction and Eagle Tavern ahead. Rejoin walk at waypoint (8). After going across to the corner of a small field go through the gate and head for the hedge ahead and a small gate half way up, go through and cross the field to the gate which opens onto Park Lane.

(7) Turn right, walking down towards the farm. Take the footpath to the left, before reaching the farm and walk ahead parallel to the A38 until you reach the former ironworks (E). (Read the information board.)

At the ironworks turn right (West) across the field then bear right (North-West) to follow the foot-path ahead as it goes across the fields to the end of Park Lane and the first houses of Heage.

(8) Bearing right walk straight on along the road (Parkside) to the T-junction. (F)

(9) At the Eagle Tavern turn left (West) along the road (B6374) and then turn first right (North) towards the church, following the windmill sign back to Heage Windmill car park.(D/A)

Waypoints :
D/A : mi 0 - alt. 410ft - Heage Windmill
1 : mi 0.88 - alt. 295ft - Lockwoods works
2 : mi 1.53 - alt. 325ft - A610
3 : mi 1.9 - alt. 295ft - Pond
4 : mi 2.6 - alt. 282ft - Canal
5 : mi 3.58 - alt. 459ft - B6374
6 : mi 3.75 - alt. 469ft - Shorter route option
7 : mi 4.35 - alt. 404ft - Park Lane
8 : mi 5.25 - alt. 446ft - Heage Village
9 : mi 5.81 - alt. 384ft - Eagle Tavern
D/A : mi 6.45 - alt. 410ft - Heage Windmill

Useful Information

Care is needed when crossing roads. Hillside and valley footpaths, using stiles and gates and expect mud.

Car park: Heage Windmill or in Heage Village. (OS ref. Explorer__ 269-367 508)
When the windmill is closed or limited parking, start in Heage village itself outside these months, parking along the road.

Alternative route available: There is a 6-mile option at waypoint(6).

More information at : https://pentrichrevolution.org.uk/walks/...

Visorando and this author cannot be held responsible in the case of accidents or problems occuring on this walk.

During the walk or to do/see around

Heage played its part in the dramatic events of that time, as working people stood up against injustice and demanded a more democratic system. Luddites attacked frames here in 1811, and the influence of the Hampden Clubs, calling for reform, would have been felt in the village, with strong support nearby in Ripley and Pentrich. In May and June 1817 John Rogers and John Stapleton, a weaver, attended the meetings at Asherfield Barn outside Pentrich village and were appointed to the ‘secret committee’ as Heage representatives. No local men were arrested or charged and it is not known how many finally joined the march.

(A) The six-sailed Heage Windmill, was built between 1791-1797. Heage Hall dates from the sixteenth century. You can see Heage Hall in the valley to your left as you cross down the hill towards Sawmills. The Cromford Canal, that is reached at Sawmills, was authorised by Parliament in 1789 and opened in 1794 to link with the Erewash and Nottingham canals at Langley Mill. It was engineered by William Jessop, with Benjamin Outram, Jessop’s partner at Butterley Ironworks.

(B) After crossing Wingfield Park collecting men and weapons, the rebels reached Pentrich Lane End. A group went on to Buckland Hollow to Mr Wheatcroft's farm, forcing entry by breaking the door. They took a gun, a knife and three men were forced to join the march. One, John Dexter, said he was compelled to carry a gun. The marchers returned to Pentrich Lane End and continued on to Pentrich.

(C) From the evidence of the map of the rebels’ march used at the Derby trial, one group left Pentrich and came this way looking for weapons and men. Arriving near Lower Hartshay they went to the farm of Peter Coupe, and house of a collier, Roger Wragg, who both went with the marchers. William Coupe said 6 or 7 men forced open his door at 3am and took a gun and a pistol, and that Peter Coupe had a gun. The rebels continued towards Butterley Works, visiting Padley Hall to take a gun and a servant, Charles Walters, who had been concealed in a chest. After the arrests, Miles Bacon hid in Pentrich. When the soldiers arrived in Pentrich, Miles ran towards Lower Hartshay and jumped the canal on his way to Leicestershire and freedom, returning to Derbyshire some years later.

(D) At a meeting of rebels at the White Horse in Pentrich on 8th June, it was reported that there were two barrels of gunpowder stored in Heage at the warehouse of the grocer, Mr Harvey. He was told to bring them to Pentrich on
the following night. John Stapleton came to Pentrich on the 9th June and told the gathered rebels that they did not have the strength to bring them. The marchers left without them. If anyone from Heage had gone to join the Ripley men who joined the rising, they would have travelled this road that night.

(E) Butterley Ironworks, visted by the rebels would have looked similar to this in
1817.

(F) You will be passing buildings that were here in 1817 - St Luke's Church, dating from the 14th century, but rebuilt in 1661 after being burnt down in a fire.

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The GPS track and description are the property of the author.