Lothian-90 Walk

A 90 mile walk (in nine sections) across West, Mid and East Lothian. The full traverse has been designed as a quiet, scenic route along quiet footpaths and lanes, with a minimal amount of roadside walking. All sections are easily reached by public transport.

Technical sheet
No. 24782112
A North Lanarkshire walk posted on 02/08/22 by Roy's Edimburg Walks. Update : 02/08/22
Author's time Author's time : 9 days
Distance Distance : 71.08mi
Vertical gain Vertical gain : 2303ft
Vertical drop Vertical drop : 2802ft
Highest point Highest point : 1148ft
Lowest point Lowest point : 3ft
Moderate Difficulty : Moderate
Back to starting point Back to starting point : No
Walking Walking
Location Location : North Lanarkshire
Starting point Starting point : N 55.8627° / W 3.76045°
Ending point Ending point : N 55.997563° / W 2.540939°

Step by step walk

This walk needs several days, please find the details below.

Harthill to Addiewell, Lothian

First leg of a 90-mile walk (in 9 stages) across the whole of the Lothians, using quiet footpaths, country parks, disused railway lines, river banks, tracks and the occasional minor road.

Addiewell to Mid-Calder, Lothian

Second leg of a 90-mile walk across the whole of the Lothians, using quiet footpaths, country parks, disused railway lines, river banks, tracks and the occasional minor road.

Mid-Calder to Long Hermiston, Lothian

Third Leg of a 90-mile walk across the whole of the Lothians, using quiet footpaths, country parks, disused railway lines, river banks, tracks and the occasional minor road.

Long Hermiston to Mauricewood, Lothian

Fourth Leg of a 90-mile walk across the whole of the Lothians, using quiet footpaths, country parks, disused railway lines, river banks, tracks and the occasional minor road.

Gorebridge to Ormiston, Lothian

Sixth Leg of a 90-mile walk across the whole of the Lothians, using quiet footpaths, country parks, disused railway lines, river banks, tracks and the occasional minor road.

Ormiston to Haddington, Lothian

Seventh Leg of a 90-mile walk across the whole of the Lothians, using quiet footpaths, country parks, disused railway lines, river banks, tracks and the occasional minor road.

Haddington to West Barns, Lothian

Eighth, penultimate, leg of a 90-mile walk across the whole of the Lothians, using quiet footpaths, country parks, disused railway lines, river banks, tracks and the occasional minor road.

Useful Information

Find more information about this walk on Roy's Edimburg Walks website here.

Visorando and this author cannot be held responsible in the case of accidents or problems occuring on this walk.

During the walk or to do/see around

Lothian is the region of the Scottish Lowlands lying between the Firth of Forth and the Southern Uplands. It encompasses the old, historic counties of West Lothian, Edinburghshire (Midlothian), and East Lothian. The complete ‘Lothian Transect Route' crosses the whole of the Lothians, from its far western edge (Harthill) to its most easterly point (Dunglass), in nine 10-mile long sections. All nine legs have been designed to begin and end at places well served by public transport.
West Lothian sits astride the main routes between Edinburgh and the west. Originally a pleasant, fertile and well-wooded county, West Lothian became industrialised from the 1840s onwards. First ironstone, then coal and shale mining dotted the landscape with bings. Today the remaining bings are treasured as industrial monuments - the pink ones are shale, the grey ones coal. Since WWII the heavy industry has gone and been replaced by electronics and service industries. Thousands of houses came with the development of Livingstone New Town. Such overspill towns were an ambitious post-WWII attempt to meet Scotland’s housing challenge, caused by the shortage in the big cities. Despite all these C19th and C20th developments it is possible to walk across West Lothian along quiet footpaths, through pleasant community woodlands, over reclaimed bings, along riversides and though old country parks.

Midlothian provides more space and solitude. The transect route crosses through the Pentland Hills, ever popular with hill walkers or outdoor enthusiasts, and then onward through more old mining and manufacturing areas into a rich agricultural landscape. Old railway lines nowadays provide handy walking and cycling paths.
East Lothian is one of the most picturesque areas of Scotland. It also had an extremely important agricultural and industrial past. Officially the sunniest and driest area in Scotland, it has a gentle, open aspect and is home to a rich variety of wildlife. It is bounded on the south by the Lammermuir Hills and stretches eastwards to the boundary with Scottish Borders at Dunglass.

Other walks in the area

Walker
distance 11.63mi Vertical gain +407ft Vertical drop -358ft Durée 5h40 Easy Easy
Starting point Starting point in North Lanarkshire

First leg of a 90-mile walk (in 9 stages) across the whole of the Lothians, using quiet footpaths, country parks, disused railway lines, river banks, tracks and the occasional minor road.

Walker
distance 9.3mi Vertical gain +79ft Vertical drop -377ft Durée 4h20 Easy Easy
Starting point Starting point in West Lothian

Second leg of a 90-mile walk across the whole of the Lothians, using quiet footpaths, country parks, disused railway lines, river banks, tracks and the occasional minor road.

Walker
distance 8.63mi Vertical gain +144ft Vertical drop -253ft Durée 4h05 Easy Easy
Starting point Starting point in West Lothian

Third Leg of a 90-mile walk across the whole of the Lothians, using quiet footpaths, country parks, disused railway lines, river banks, tracks and the occasional minor road.

Organisation / Walking Club / Mountain guide
The Falls of Clyde, New Lanark
distance 3.68mi Vertical gain +390ft Vertical drop -410ft Durée 2h00 Moderate Moderate
Starting point Starting point in South Lanarkshire

Best experienced after a period of sustained rainfall, this section of the River Clyde is pretty spectacular. Starting in the historical village of New Lanark, the track forms the last section of the Clyde Walkway and is basically a woodland walk with viewpoints to the waterfalls along the river, the most photographed of these being Corra Linn which plunges down 26m over the rocks!

Organisation / Walking Club / Mountain guide
Tinto Hill
distance 4.22mi Vertical gain +1565ft Vertical drop -1565ft Durée 3h20 Difficult Difficult
Starting point Starting point in South Lanarkshire

A good one if you are new to hill walking thanks to the well-trodden footpath from start to finish. Lovely views of Lanarkshire and beyond on a clear day! Tinto summit is at 711m / 2332ft so a serious hill walk.

Organisation / Walking Club / Mountain guide
Pittencrieff Park & Dunfermline Abbey
distance 1.58mi Vertical gain +144ft Vertical drop -118ft Durée 0h50 Easy Easy
Starting point Starting point in Fife

Known locally as “The Glen”, the beautiful 76 acre Pittencrieff Park was gifted to the people of Dunfermline by Andrew Carnegie. This short walk takes in some of the park’s best bits before allowing you to explore Dunfermline Abbey, burial site of King Robert the Bruce. Keep a look out for the resident peacocks whilst in the park!

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The GPS track and description are the property of the author.