Rievaulx Circular Walk

A circular walk around the countryside West of Rievaulx Abbey, passing the fish ponds that were established by the monks, the lovely village of Old Byland and its ancient church, then Caydale Mill and the valley that returns to the River Rye and the emerging views of Rievaulx Abbey.

Technical sheet
No. 3809019
A Old Byland and Scawton walk posted on 12/08/20 by Alwayswiththehills. Update : 20/11/20
Calculated time Calculated time: 3h30[?]
Distance Distance : 6.67mi
Vertical gain Vertical gain : 469ft
Vertical drop Vertical drop : 463ft
Highest point Highest point : 712ft
Lowest point Lowest point : 256ft
Average Difficulty : Average
Back to starting point Back to starting point : Yes
Walking Walking
Area Area : North York Moors
Location Location : Old Byland and Scawton
Starting point Starting point : N 54.254475° / W 1.119438°
Download : -
Rievaulx Abbey Carving Old Byland Church Rievaulx Bridge

Description

This is a circular walk and as such you can start from a variety of places on the way. However, starting from Rievaulx Abbey means that you can combine the walk with a visit to the ruins of the Abbey and Rievaulx Terrace.

English Heritage is currently (2020) running a booking system for entry to the abbey and parking is restricted to those with bookings, regardless of membership.

There is some limited parking on the road just before the abbey and a lay-by for four cars about a 150m after the abbey, which is where this walk starts from. (Other parking in the area will be highlighted in the description below.)

(D/A) From the lay-by follow the road South, for a short way there is a narrow path on the right beside the river but otherwise you will be on the road, take care to walk in single file. You will arrive at a T junction and a very scenic bridge on the right. (Rievaulx Bridge)

(1) Turn right and pass over Rievaulx Bridge. Immediately after the bridge, there is a delightful cottage, continue along the road to a triangular junction on the right.

(2) There is a space for 2 carefully parked cars on the right side on the triangular junction. Ignore the junction and continue along the road, passing Hagg Hall on the left to a track on the right.

(3) There is parking for 3 carefully parked cars at the junction. Turn right and follow the track through a gate, you will soon come to a series of ponds on the right. These were built by the monks and stocked as fish ponds to provide food. They are currently (2020) being excavated to remove silt and restore them and this will also serve as a catchment for water and help prevent flooding downstream in times of heavy rain. At the end of the lakes, the track splits.

(4) Turn right and cross the stream using some well made stepping stones. After these ignore the bridge on the right and instead go through a gate on the left into a field. On the far side is another bridge, cross this to gain the path running steadily up through Callister Wood, with a collapsed and overgrown dry stone wall on the left. At the top go through a gate and into a cultivated field. Follow the side of the field and pass into a second field, this will lead you to a farm track. Go straight over the track and a patch of grass and through a gate into some woods. Turn left and walk through the woods. The path passes over some bedding planes of the local limestone which is worn smooth by the passing of feet. It can be slippery and there are nettles so take care that an inadvertent slip does not send you into these. (In summer the nettles can be invasive so trousers rather than shorts will make your passage through this section more enjoyable.) The path will lead out of the wood and up to a road.

(5) Go through a gate and turn right onto the road. Walk in single file into the delightful village of Old Byland. Pass one turning on the left and then take the left bend in the road turning up past the village green. The entrance to the church is on the right, beside The Rectory. Take some time to view it; the church is Anglo Saxon with some later Norman additions. The carvings around the door and bell tower window are of particular note. (It would also be possible to park in Old Byland)
Return across the green and turn right to follow the road through the village, uphill again. At the T junction turn left and at the next T junction turn right. After a short distance, the road takes a turn to the right; go straight ahead. After about 500m the road turns to the left and descends. Below and on the right you will see a house below you (Caydale Mill), look out for a gate on the right.

(6) Go through this gate and onto the bridle path above the mill which is now a private house. The bridle track passes across the moor and then through another gate and into woods. (The path through the woods can be muddy, even in dry spells so make sure you have suitable footwear) The path descends gently and then eventually passes through two more gates to bring you out on a farm track.

(7) Go straight ahead (ignore the turnings left to Tylas Farm and right up into a field and to Tylas Barn) and follow the track to a small stream and picnic bench, look to the left for a narrow path.

(8) Take the path on the left and through a gate to follow the path beside a field with the River Rye beyond that, A meander in the river will bring it towards the path where a well constructed wooden walkway makes this section passable in the wet. After this the path crosses beside a second field and up through a gate to a farm track. (An alternative is to continue along the track which leads up and then down to point (9) This might be useful if the River Rye is swollen)

(9) Turn left on the track and follow it to cross Bow Bridge, the track bends to the right and starts to ascend. Look out for a wooden signpost on the right.(Inn Way, Rievaulx)

(10) Follow the signpost, go through a gate into a field and cross this diagonally in the direction of the river, to cross a small stream into a second field, Follow the path beside the 'canal' and then pass through two more wooden gates, into and out of a farm yard, to gain the road running through Rievaulx.

(11) Turn right and walk past the abbey and back to your car.(D/A)

Waypoints :
D/A : mi 0 - alt. 276ft - Rievaulx Abbey
1 : mi 0.26 - alt. 259ft - Rievaulx Bridge
2 : mi 0.5 - alt. 292ft - Space for a few car
3 : mi 0.97 - alt. 387ft - Space for a few car
4 : mi 1.5 - alt. 400ft - Stream
5 : mi 2.55 - alt. 623ft - Gate
6 : mi 3.53 - alt. 515ft - Gate
7 : mi 4.94 - alt. 387ft - Tylas Farm
8 : mi 5.25 - alt. 322ft - Path
9 : mi 5.82 - alt. 282ft - Bow Bridge
10 : mi 6.03 - alt. 299ft - Signpost
11 : mi 6.42 - alt. 272ft - Rievaulx
D/A : mi 6.67 - alt. 269ft - Rievaulx Abbey

Useful Information

There are few places to take shelter on this walk but the woodland does provide some shade from the sun if doing the walk a hot day.

Take everything you need with you. As mentioned one section suffers from encroaching nettles in the summer and trousers rather than shorts are useful. The path can be muddy in places, especially the woodland section from Caydale Mill so appropriate footwear will help.

The walk can be shortened from point 4 by taking the Inn Way path which leads around the back of the fish ponds and over to point 9 via Reins Farm.

Visorando and this author cannot be held responsible in the case of accidents or problems occuring on this walk.

During the walk or to do/see around

Rievaulx Abbey is stunning and well worth the visit if you can get a slot booked. Info here https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visi...

The 18th Century Terrace above is also worth a visit https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/rievaul...

A significant battle during the Scottish Wars of Independence took place near Old Byland in 1322. Edward II had failed in his attempt to re-invade Scotland and had retreated. He was staying at Rievaulx Abbey when Robert the Bruce counter invaded England. The battle is thought to have been fought on Roulston Scar, the escarpment just to the south of Sutton Bank, but is known as the Battle of Old Byland.

Opinions and comments

Average

Global average : 5/5
Number of opinions : 1
Description quality : 5/5
Routemap quality : 5/5
Walk interest : 5/5


Walker
on Mon 17 Aug 2020 16:30:48 CEST

Global average : 5 / 5

Date of walk : 15/08/20
Description quality : Very good
Routemap quality : Very good
Walk interest : Very good

We really enjoyed this walk. We had done parts of it before as smaller circular walks, but this fitted two of our previous walks together, and it was interesting to see how they connected. We parked at Old Byland, because we knew that there would definitely be parking there and it was a shorter drive for us than to Rievaulx. When we had walked from Rievaulx in the past, we had always done that part of this walk the opposite way round, so were delighted at the lovely view of the Abbey going in the other direction! The walk has plenty of variety, and it was interesting to walk by the monks' fish ponds near Rievaulx. There are good views on the walk and the terrain is varied. The walk from Rievaulx is on the road, but there is very little traffic, so it's okay. Make sure you ignore the gate opposite Hagg Hall near Rievaulx and walk slightly further up the road.

Other walks in the area

distance 9.76mi Vertical gain +755ft Vertical drop -755ft Durée 5h10 Average Average
Starting point Starting point in Helmsley - North Yorkshire

This North York Moors walk starts from Helmsley and takes in Beck Dale, the River Rye & Rievaulx Abbey before joining the final stage of the Cleveland Way from Rievaulx Bridge back to Helmsley.

distance 12.51mi Vertical gain +1637ft Vertical drop -1640ft Durée 7h10 Difficult Difficult
Starting point Starting point in Cold Kirby - North Yorkshire

This North York Moors walk includes a further stage in the series of circular walks on the theme of the Cleveland Way. This route takes in a short section of the Cleveland Way between Cold Kirby and Rievaulx Bridge and provides an excellent taste of the scenery in this area.

distance 9.55mi Vertical gain +495ft Vertical drop -499ft Durée 4h50 Average Average
Starting point Starting point in Helmsley - North Yorkshire

This North York Moors walk around Rievaulx Moor is easy to follow and gives periodic views into the lower valleys below the Rievaulx Bank. There are some muddy stretches after heavy rain.

distance 11.5mi Vertical gain +364ft Vertical drop -348ft Durée 5h35 Average Average
Starting point Starting point in Oswaldkirk - North Yorkshire

This North Yorkshire walk is full of interest, visiting three villages, the rivers Rye and Riccal, a section of old railway and a section of the Ebor Way. The route also starts from an excellent pub.

distance 8.33mi Vertical gain +1142ft Vertical drop -1168ft Durée 4h50 Average Average
Starting point Starting point in Hawnby - North Yorkshire

This North York Moors route explores the moors to the north of the village of Hawnby and mainly uses moorland tracks. The walk makes a circuit of Hawnby, Bilsdale West and Wetherhouse Moors and gives views into upper Ryedale, Bilsdale and Ladhill Gill.

distance 10.13mi Vertical gain +876ft Vertical drop -876ft Durée 5h25 Average Average
Starting point Starting point in Bransdale - North Yorkshire

This North York Moors circular walk's main focus is to enjoy the views from Rudland Rigg. This is a quiet part of this National Park and you can almost be guaranteed solitude.

A circular tour of Farndale: ridge top and valley bottom
distance 11.77mi Vertical gain +1106ft Vertical drop -1099ft Durée 6h20 Average Average
Starting point Starting point in Farndale West - North Yorkshire

This lovely walk takes you on a tour of upper Farndale; a delightful and peaceful valley in the North York Moors. Starting at Low Mill it heads immediately uphill onto Blakey Ridge and follows the old iron ore railway towards the head of the dale, with great views, before descending into farmland and eventually taking the riverside path back to Low Mill. Where the walking is on the road these are quiet and traffic will be infrequent.

Black Hambleton Circular
distance 6.5mi Vertical gain +732ft Vertical drop -732ft Durée 3h40 Easy Easy
Starting point Starting point in Osmotherley - North Yorkshire

A circular walk around and over Black Hambleton and the end of Arden Moor; described here in a clockwise direction but just as good in reverse. There is a mixture of open moorland crossed via broad tracks and upland pasture crossed by narrow paths through the heather.

For more walks, use our search engine.

The GPS track and description are the property of the author.