The Aftermath, Alfreton, Pentrich and South Wingfield Revolution walk

The walk will visit places in and around Pentrich and the Amber Valley which remind us of the impact of the June 1817 ‘Pentrich Revolution’ on people's lives one year after the Rising. This is Walk 20 of the Pentrich and South Wingfield Revolution group.

Technical sheet
No. 23105166
A Pentrich walk posted on 17/06/22 by Pentrich Revolution Group. Update : 17/06/22
Calculated time Calculated time: 2h25[?]
Distance Distance : 4.6mi
Vertical gain Vertical gain : 371ft
Vertical drop Vertical drop : 377ft
Highest point Highest point : 486ft
Lowest point Lowest point : 253ft
Easy Difficulty : Easy
Back to starting point Back to starting point : Yes
Walking Walking
Location Location : Pentrich
Starting point Starting point : N 53.070197° / W 1.420273°
Download : -
River Amber River Amber Samuel Hunt’s house The mill

Description

Start : The Pentrich Village Hall, OS Explorer 269 ref. 390 526

(D/A) Starting at the Village Hall (A), walk North along the main road (B6016) towards Swanwick. When the road bends to the right take the footpath on the left side of the road (North), which continues straight ahead. Continue to follow the footpath, walking ahead through the gate and keeping to the left of the hedge. (Do not cross the stile to the right.) Walk on with the open field and view of the Amber Valley to your left (B). Across the valley see Wingfield Manor to your right and Crich to the left.

(1) Follow the track to the left (West) before reaching Coneygrey farm and take the roadway down the hill to the left. Go through the gate on the right and cross the field ahead to a stile. Cross and wait as you reach the busy road (B6013).

(2) Cross the road when it is safe to do so and walk for a short distance to the left, watching for oncoming vehicles. Turn right on the footpath. Take care as the path is initially steep. Cross the high stile with care. Walk down the field to the stile in the left-hand corner. Cross with care to reach the road.

(3) Take the road ahead to cross the bridge over the River Amber and continue under the railway line. Immediately turn left (South-West) and follow the path to a stile. Cross the field to the second stile and then walk straight ahead to cross the large field to reach the bank. Follow this to the left and then turn right along the edge of the next field to reach the minor road.

(4) Follow the road to the left (South), turning off onto the track on the left as the road turns right. Continue on this track to Lodge Hill Farm (C).

(5) Walk past the farm and turn left (South-East) down the track. When the track turns to the right continue across the field (South-East), parallel to the River Amber. The path crosses the River in the far left corner of the field. Over the footbridge is the B6013, a busy road.

(6) Turn right (South) and take care walking along the verge until reaching Pentrich Mill (D). Continue to walk down the B6013 (E), now on pavement, until reaching the junction with the A610. Cross the B6013 at the traffic lights, and walk on the left of the A610 on the wide grass verge. Continue for a half-mile until the second bus shelter.

(7) Before reaching this shelter take the footpath to the left (North-East). Going through the bushes follow the path up the bank to reach a footpath ascending the hill between hedgerows. Continue up the path through the gate and turn right (North-East) along the path to reach the road at Pentrich village.

(8) Reaching the road (B6016) near the site of the former non-conformist chapel (F) continue to the right into the village. The Dog Inn on your right and St Matthew’s Church on the left. The Village Hall is directly ahead. (D/A)

Waypoints :
D/A : mi 0 - alt. 469ft - Pentrich Village Hall
1 : mi 0.66 - alt. 427ft - Coneygrey farm
2 : mi 0.84 - alt. 371ft - B6013
3 : mi 1.09 - alt. 266ft - Road - River Amber
4 : mi 1.77 - alt. 348ft - Minor road
5 : mi 2.3 - alt. 374ft - Lodge Hill Farm
6 : mi 2.79 - alt. 262ft - B6013
7 : mi 3.8 - alt. 322ft - Bus shelter
8 : mi 4.29 - alt. 423ft - B6016
D/A : mi 4.6 - alt. 469ft - Pentrich Village Hall

Useful Information

Undulating, mostly footpaths, some roads, several awkward stiles to cross. Care needed when crossing roads
Car Park: The Dog Inn, customers only. On the roadside on Asherfield Lane.
Start: The Pentrich Village Hall, OS Explorer 269 ref. 390 526

More information at Pentrich and South Wingfield Revolution here.

Visorando and this author cannot be held responsible in the case of accidents or problems occuring on this walk.

During the walk or to do/see around

The walk will visit places in and around Pentrich and the Amber Valley which remind us of the impact of the June 1817 ‘Pentrich Revolution’ on people's lives one year after the Rising.

(A) The Village Hall is on the site of the house of Thomas Bacon, framework knitter and radical reformer. He was to go into hiding before the Rising, fearing arrest as a leader of the rebels. He was transported for life, sent in 1817 on the convict ship Tottenham to Sydney Cove and then to Paramatta. His home was demolished and a village school was built on the site. Those related to Thomas, including Bacons and Weightmans, and other rebels' families, were evicted and families left destitute.

(B) Descending the field you will see wooded Coalburn Hill directly ahead. Here was the quarry worked by William Turner and Isaac Ludlam. Both were executed in Derby in November 1817 for their part in the Rising. Edward Turner was transported to Australia for life. Only Joseph Turner and Abraham James were left to work the quarry.

(C) The farmer, Samuel Hunt, joined the rebels and was transported for life. He was taken to Sydney on the convict ship Isabella during 1818 and then to Paramatta in New South Wales.

(D) See the plaque telling how Thomas Bacon hid near the Mill. Despite a 100 guineas reward offered for his capture, he and his brother John evaded capture until 15th August when caught in St. Ives in Huntingdonshire, to then be taken for trial in Derby. Other rebels also avoided capture for many weeks. Ludlam was arrested in Uttoxeter and Brandreth in Bulwell, both in late July.

(E) It was down this hillside that Miles Bacon ran to avoid arrest. After the Rising failed he had hidden in a hayloft and was fed by the non-conformist minister. When soldiers came he ran from the village, with soldiers giving chase. He leapt across the Cromford canal between Lower Hartshay and Buckland Hollow and escaped capture. He settled in Leicestershire and married. He returned when it was safe to get his mother out of the workhouse. She had been left unsupported, as her husband and brother in law had been transported. Miles settled, with his family, as a stockinger in Belper.

(F) The Curate of the Church, Rev. Hugh Wolstenholme, had been too sympathetic to the rebels and their families in the eyes of the Duke of Devonshire and Mr Lockett, his Derby Solicitor. He was forced out of his post in March 1818 and fearing that he would be arrested he fled to America. Here he would gain a reputation for standing up for the poor and opposing slavery. The Duke of Devonshire visited Pentrich in April 1818, with Lockett and Colonel Wingfield Halton. He was pleased to hear of the ‘reformed attitudes’ of the villagers. He then visited Swanwick Hall to see the new vicar of Pentrich, Rev. John Wood, and to plan the new church at Ripley.

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